Endling, the power of the last in an extinction-prone world

Environmental Philosophy, doi: 10.5840/envirophil201612542

Online First: December 6, 2016

Abstract:

In April 1996, two men working at a convalescent center wrote a letter to the journal Nature proposing that a new word be adopted to designate a person who is the last in the lineage: endling. This had come up because of … Continue reading

Presence of absence, absence of presence, and extinction narratives

In Nature, Temporality and Environmental Management: Scandinavian and Australian Perspectives on Peoples and Landscapes, ed. Lesley Head, Katarina Saltzman, Gunhild Setten, and Marie Stensek, 45-58. Routledge, 2016.

Abstract: This chapter addresses where two issues – the problem of not seeing at a certain time and the idea of a static nature over … Continue reading

Forest‒Stream Linkages, Anthropogenic Stressors and Climate Change: Implications for Restoration Planning

Joakim Hjältén, Christer Nilsson, Dolly Jørgensen, and David Bell

BioScience 66, no. 8 (August 2016): 646-654.

Abstract: The global extraction of forest and water resources has led to habitat degradation, biodiversity loss, and declines in ecosystem services. As a consequence, ecological restoration has become a global priority. Restoration efforts to offset this … Continue reading

The Anthropocene as a History of Technology

Finn Arne Jørgensen and Dolly Jørgensen, Technology and Culture 57(1):231-237.

This exhibit review discusses the Welcome to the Anthropocene: The Earth in Our Hands exhibit at the Deutsches Museum, Munich, within the context of how history of technology should engage with the Anthropocene concept. We argue that technology is the linchpin in the Anthropocene as … Continue reading

Forest restoration to attract a putative umbrella species, the white-backed woodpecker, benefited saproxylic beetles

David Bell, Joakim Hjältén, Christer Nilsson, Dolly Jørgensen, Therese Johansson

Ecosphere 6, no. 12: [online]. DOI: 10.1890/ES14-00551.1  [Open Access]

Umbrella species are often spatially demanding and have limited ability to adapt to environmental changes induced by human land-use. This makes them vulnerable to human encroachment. In Sweden, broadleaved trees are disadvantaged by forestry, and commercially … Continue reading